The Network folder specified is currently mapped

If you try to map a network drive and an error that specifies you are already mapped to the drive but are not, you can try several things.

Run services.msc
Stop the Workstation Service (This in turn will stop the Browser Service)
Restart BOTH services

Try to map the drive

Another fix may be to run the following from a command prompt.

cd \
net use * /d /y
NET USE /persistent:no
nbtstat -R
nbtstat -RR
ipconfig /release
ipconfig /flushdns
arp -d *
ipconfig /renew

 

This can be put into a batch file as a tool.  Open notepad and copy and paste the following:

net stop workstation
y
net start workstation
net start browser
cd \
net use * /d /y
NET USE /persistent:no
nbtstat -R
nbtstat -RR
ipconfig /release
ipconfig /flushdns
arp -d *
ipconfig /renew

Save the file as dumpcache.bat (be sure to change the extension to all).

You can now run this in an administrative command prompt window.

Why do you subnet?

Why? The Golden Question

All over the internet you will find information on ‘How to Subnet’.   Suddenly you are thrown into a world of bits and binary and given charts of ‘How to Subnet’.   But why do you subnet?

Subnets are created to separate areas of your network for security and/or to hold down broadcasts.  Computers constantly ‘talk’ to each other.   If you have a network of 10 computers, the talking (opening files or programs) or broadcasting packets that are sent out during networking is not much traffic at all.   However if you have 10,000 computers talking and passing data, you will have thousands of computers passing data and your network will slow down from all of the information.   If you still don’t understand, invite 10 friends over for a get together.  It’ll get noisy but you can still hear every conversation.    Now, go to a rock concert with 10,000 screaming fans.   Get the picture.

Subnetting allows you to divide areas of your network out to prevent this.   So here comes the golden question.  How can you get them to ‘talk’ when you need to?   With the installation of a Layer 3 Switch or a router, these subnets can talk.

And for all of the folks who know a ton of details on the subject, this is just an example for people who are searching why to subnet.

Other Ways to Divide Your Network

Are there other ways to divide your network?  You can use VLANs.  Devices such as switches allow virtual lans to be set up.    By purchasing managed switches, you can separate different areas of your network thus separating areas for security and holding down traffic.

So now I know why – but how and don’t give me binary and all the fuzzy stuff!

The best explaination I have found is at this link.   A simple chart with examples!

Here’s my example -

Subnetting allows your network to become more efficient and allows you to separate your network by subnets.

Let’s say your network is on a 192.168.1.x numbering scheme.

How do you know what your network is?  Open a command prompt and type ipconfig.   See the gateway?  That is your starting number for your network.   The network allows 254 computers to be in the broadcast domain.

So if you do an ipconfig and see this-

192.168.1.125      - your ip address
255.255.255.0    - your current subnet
192.168.1.1           – your gateway (This is your router or firewall – the point leading to the internet)

Now let’s say you have 20 devices in your network.   How can you effectively hold down broadcast and prevent your router from building tables for each device?  How can you make it more effective and hold down traffic?   Actually without understanding binary, you can do this.   Remember this is basics and should help you understand.

You see under the current network, you can have 254 devices in your network.  Printers, routers, computers, tablets, netbooks, notebooks, etc.    The last set of numbers called an octet only goes from 1-254.   But lets narrow this down.

You can use a CIDR calculator online to determine how to tweak your network.   A good site is Subnet Calculator.   Go there and enter your router’s number in the ip field.   Now go down and enter a number close to the number of devices you have on your network.  In this example, enter 30.

Did you see where the subnet changed to 255.255.255.224?    (Did you notice that 224 + 30 is 254?)

Ok, now open your adapter settings by clicking the network icon at the bottom right corner and selecting Open Network and Sharing Center.

Now click on the adapter settings.

Right click and select properties on your adapter that is active.

Now select Internet Protocol v4

Enter an ip address statically (manually put it in).  Put in your new subnet and your gateway.   You must also put in your DNS or a public DNS server.  You should keep a list of each devices number to avoid any problems.  All ip addresses must be different on each device.

The only valid numbers in this broadcast domain now is – 192.168.1.1, 192.168.1.2, 192.168.1.3 continuing until you get to 192.168.1.30 (remember you chose to have up to 30 devices on your network.)  If you enter any number above this, you will get an error.

Error screen showing an ip address above what you selected.

If you get the above error screen, you have entered an invalid number.

After you select a number between 192.168.1.1 and 192.168.1.30, click OK and exit all screens by clicking OK.

If you do an ipconfig now, you will see this-

When you change subnets as the above example shows, you have to remember that you may lose connectivity to devices such as routers or network printers.   You will need to set devices such as servers and these devices on the same subnet so that whoever is assigned this subnet can communicate with them.

This by no means is a thorough subnetting lesson.   It can become much more complex by introducing multiple routers into your network, DHCP servers or other devices.   This is a simple how-to that shows you how broadcast domains can be more efficient.

Resolve wireless issues by adjusting advanced power savings

Usually when I resolve a problem, there seems to be an outbreak of the same problem.   Lately I resolved issues with wireless networking on several laptops and a desktop by disabling the power settings.  Apparently when the laptop woke, it would not connect or was extremely slow on connecting.  Disabling the power settings in both areas resolved the issue on all of the laptops and the desktop.

Power under the Device Manager

- Right Click Computer, Manage, Select Device Manager, Double Click on Wireless card, Click the Power Management tab.  Uncheck the All the computer to turn off this device to save power

Very First Power Settings

Use the Advanced Power settings to turn off power settings on wireless adapters

Power Settings First

Click on Change plan settings (above)

Power settings

Click on Change advanced power settings (above)

Advanced Power

Scroll down to Wireless Adapter Setting, click the + sign, click the + sign beside Power Saving Mode.  Change the On battery setting to Maximum Performance and Plugged in to Maximum Performance.  Apply the settings.

InSSIDer 3.0 Personal

InSSIDer 3.0 Personal Edition is available for download at Metageek.  InSSIDer 3.0 is an excellent tool used to analyze and see your wireless APs.

Inssider 30

Note:  If you currently use InSSIDer version 2.1 and use the GPS features, 3.0 personal does not have this feature.  

Red X on network icon – Windows 7

Have you ever experienced a red X   on the network icon in the taskbar on Windows 7?

Symptoms -

  • Red X on the network icon (by time on taskbar)
  • Still able to go to the internet

Click “Start or orb”
Run or Search box
type “dcomcnfg” and hit enter
Find: Component Services-Computers-My Computer-DCOM Config-netprofm
Right click “netprofm”
Click on “Properties”  select “Security”
Navigate to “Launch and Activation Permissions” section changed to “Customize”
Click “Edit”
Click “Add..”   Type “LOCAL SERVICE” as the object names then click “OK”
In “Permissions for LOCAL SERVICE”, select “Allow” for “Local Launch” and “Local Activition”  Click  “OK”, Click “OK”
Reboot

All of the Windows Services should restart and you should be able to join domains, have the icon repaired and be able to perform all network tasks.

In the case where it is greyed out – On the general tab, you will see the Application ID.  Write this down.  Now open up regedit.

  • Go to HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\AppID\the app id
  • Right click on the key
  • Permissions
  • Advanced
  • Ownership – Change to the Administrator
  • Click Apply and OK
  • Give the Administrator Full Control
  • Close out the registry

Other common problems may be-missing Network Adapters under connections

If you have this problem (above) you may need to re-register 3 dlls. Follow these steps. (Error normally found in Windows XP or 7)

Start, Run. cmd.exe

regsvr32 netshell.dll
regsvr32 netcfgx.dll
regsvr32 netman.dll

Also make sure Simple TCP/IP is enabled by following these steps:

a. In Control Panel, double-click Add or Remove Programs.
b. Click Add/Remove Windows Components.
c. Click Networking Services, and then click Details. Verify that Simple TCP/IP Services is turned on

 

or

services.msc set “WWAN AutoConfig” to automatic, and start the service.

In the device manager uninstall ALL network adapters. Then right click and select “Scan Hardware For Changes” allow windows 7 to install the adapters. (No need to select remove driver)

See our article -

Phrases you may hear in IT

Optimize Your Network Settings

Want to further optimize your network settings?   Use this little known settings in Windows. (Directions are for Windows Vista and Windows 7 – settings apply to Windows XP also).

  • Open the Network and Sharing Center
  • Click on Change Adapter Settings
  • Hit the Alt Key
  • Click Advanced
  • Advanced Settings
  • Under Adapters and Bindings, Move the Network you use to the top
  • Under the Provider Order, Move Microsoft Windows Network to the Top

[Scheduled Post]

NTLM Settings in Windows Vista or 7

You may have devices on your network that you can no longer connect (Vista/Windows 7) to or you may not be able to network to Windows XP (for whatever reason, this works).  This changes settings to accept NTLMv1 and NTLMv2 so that you can connect to Samba Servers, Snap Servers, Older Windows Computers or whatever….

1. Go to Run, Type Regedit and open this key:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa

2. If it doesn’t exist, create a DWORD value named
LmCompatibilityLevel

3. Set the value to 1

4. Reboot

Enable NetBIOS over TCP/IP

If you have several computers on your network and would like to see the computers on your network, Enable NetBIOS over TCP/IP to speed this process up.  NetBIOS allows computers to be seen by name on your network.  Enabling NetBIOS allows your computer to find other computers in your network (Network or Network Places).

To enable NetBIOS over TCP/IP on Windows 7:

  1. Click Start, and then click Network. (click Start, type ncpa.cpl into the search box for Windows 7 or Vista, hit ENTER).
  2. Click on the Network and Sharing Center
  3. Click Manage Network Connections.
  4. Right click on the Local Area Connection select Properties.
  5. Select Internet Protocol version 4 (TCP/IPv4)
  6. Click the Advanced button under the General tab.
  7. Click the WINS tab.
  8. Click Enable NetBIOS Over TCP/IP.
  9. Click OK and Exit the settings.

Improve Your Internet Speed – Read the Article
Are you IPv6 Ready?

Setting up WINS

AMD vs Intel Quad Core Shootout

Want to optimize your computer? See our checklist!

See our review of Windows 8 and see how you can run 90% of your programs, virtualize other operating systems, use your network and more.

Now Tweak your wireless!!

Scan your network with SoftPerfect’s Network Scanner

Find and set your optimal MTU setting to improve your connectivity

MTU Ping Test

Want to determine the optimal MTU for your ISP connection?

  1. Go to Search or Run (Windows 7 vs. XP)
  2. Type in cmd. Hit the enter. A Command prompt window will open.
  3. Type ping http://www.speedtest.net -f -l 1500 and hit Enter (or a website of your choice).

  1. Look at your results.  Does the packet need to be fragmented?  Try lowering the size of the packet in increments of 8 to 10) until you have a packet size that does not fragment.

  1. Once the packets are not fragmented, begin increasing the packet size from the number you find in small increments until you find the largest size that does not fragment.  You will need to add 28 to that number  for IP/ICMP headers to get the optimal MTU setting.
  2. If you get 1410 as the largest packet size, add 28 to that number and 1438 would be your optimal MTU setting.
  3. To change the number, use TCP Optimizer.

Remember to change all computers on the network including the router’s MTU setting.

Windows System Control Center

KLS Soft has an excellent program (Windows System Control Center) that is free for personal or commercial use. WSCC  is a freeware utility that allows you to execute, organize, install and update utilities.  Utilities such as Sysinternals’, Nirsoft’s portable freeware and Windows’ utilities are available.


Understanding your network card metric setting

If you use more than one network card for mutliple LANS or connections, you can set the metric of each card to send IP packets through the fastest card first or the desired card.

For instance if you have a network card that connects to other servers and computers on one LAN and a network card that connects to a separate LAN that has security cameras; metrics can be used to compute the routing algorithm.

The one card would be set to a lower metric in order to go to the web and the security camera system would be set to a higher metric thus giving priority to the lower number.

Here’s an example of my home LAN which uses a printer and cameras on a separate network and my wireless which connects to the Internet.

So how do you change it?  Open the Network and Sharing Center – Click on Adapters – Right click the desired adapter – Select Properties – Double click TCP/IP – Click Advanced – Uncheck the Automatic Metric – Change to the desired number

Wireless

Above the wireless is set to 1.  Below the LAN which has a static IP address and no Gateway is configured with a 20.

Valid values are 1 to 9999.

Don’t forget to set the binding order of the network cards.   Go to the Adapter.  Hit the ‘Alt’ key once for the menu.  Click on Advanced and then Advanced Settings.

Move the network card with a higher priority to the top.

Little known netsh commands

How is your network card and computer routing?

Use the following command to see the routing table – from the command prompt type -

netsh interface  ipv4 show route

Publish  Type      Met  Prefix                    Idx  Gateway/Interface Name
-------  --------  ---  ------------------------  ---  ------------------------
No       Manual    0    0.0.0.0/0                  11  192.168.2.1
No       Manual    256  127.0.0.0/8                 1  Loopback Pseudo-Interface 1
No       Manual    256  127.0.0.1/32                1  Loopback Pseudo-Interface 1
No       Manual    256  127.255.255.255/32          1  Loopback Pseudo-Interface 1
No       Manual    256  192.168.2.0/24             11  Wireless Network Connection
No       Manual    256  192.168.2.77/32            11  Wireless Network Connection
No       Manual    256  192.168.2.255/32           11  Wireless Network Connection
No       Manual    256  224.0.0.0/4                 1  Loopback Pseudo-Interface 1
No       Manual    256  224.0.0.0/4                11  Wireless Network Connection
No       Manual    256  255.255.255.255/32          1  Loopback Pseudo-Interface 1
No       Manual    256  255.255.255.255/32         11  Wireless Network Connection


If you want to see your specific routes per interface you can do that using type the 
following at a command prompt=

netsh interface ipv4 show route verbose

Destination Prefix:     0.0.0.0/0
Source Prefix:          0.0.0.0/0
Interface Index:        11
Gateway/Interface Name: 192.168.2.1
Publish:                No
Type:                   Manual
Metric:                 0
SitePrefixLength        0
ValidLifeTime           584415
PreferredLifeTime       584415


Destination Prefix:     127.0.0.0/8
Source Prefix:          0.0.0.0/0
Interface Index:        1
Gateway/Interface Name: Loopback Pseudo-Interface 1
Publish:                No
Type:                   Manual
Metric:                 256
SitePrefixLength        0
ValidLifeTime           Infinite
PreferredLifeTime       Infinite


Destination Prefix:     127.0.0.1/32
Source Prefix:          0.0.0.0/0
Interface Index:        1
Gateway/Interface Name: Loopback Pseudo-Interface 1
Publish:                No
Type:                   Manual
Metric:                 256
SitePrefixLength        0
ValidLifeTime           Infinite
PreferredLifeTime       Infinite


Destination Prefix:     127.255.255.255/32
Source Prefix:          0.0.0.0/0
Interface Index:        1
Gateway/Interface Name: Loopback Pseudo-Interface 1
Publish:                No
Type:                   Manual
Metric:                 256
SitePrefixLength        0
ValidLifeTime           Infinite
PreferredLifeTime       Infinite


Destination Prefix:     192.168.2.0/24
Source Prefix:          0.0.0.0/0
Interface Index:        11
Gateway/Interface Name: Wireless Network Connection
Publish:                No
Type:                   Manual
Metric:                 256
SitePrefixLength        0
ValidLifeTime           Infinite
PreferredLifeTime       Infinite


Destination Prefix:     192.168.2.77/32
Source Prefix:          0.0.0.0/0
Interface Index:        11
Gateway/Interface Name: Wireless Network Connection
Publish:                No
Type:                   Manual
Metric:                 256
SitePrefixLength        0
ValidLifeTime           Infinite
PreferredLifeTime       Infinite


Destination Prefix:     192.168.2.255/32
Source Prefix:          0.0.0.0/0
Interface Index:        11
Gateway/Interface Name: Wireless Network Connection
Publish:                No
Type:                   Manual
Metric:                 256
SitePrefixLength        0
ValidLifeTime           Infinite
PreferredLifeTime       Infinite


Destination Prefix:     224.0.0.0/4
Source Prefix:          0.0.0.0/0
Interface Index:        1
Gateway/Interface Name: Loopback Pseudo-Interface 1
Publish:                No
Type:                   Manual
Metric:                 256
SitePrefixLength        0
ValidLifeTime           Infinite
PreferredLifeTime       Infinite


Destination Prefix:     224.0.0.0/4
Source Prefix:          0.0.0.0/0
Interface Index:        11
Gateway/Interface Name: Wireless Network Connection
Publish:                No
Type:                   Manual
Metric:                 256
SitePrefixLength        0
ValidLifeTime           Infinite
PreferredLifeTime       Infinite


Destination Prefix:     255.255.255.255/32
Source Prefix:          0.0.0.0/0
Interface Index:        1
Gateway/Interface Name: Loopback Pseudo-Interface 1
Publish:                No
Type:                   Manual
Metric:                 256
SitePrefixLength        0
ValidLifeTime           Infinite
PreferredLifeTime       Infinite


Destination Prefix:     255.255.255.255/32
Source Prefix:          0.0.0.0/0
Interface Index:        11
Gateway/Interface Name: Wireless Network Connection
Publish:                No
Type:                   Manual
Metric:                 256
SitePrefixLength        0
ValidLifeTime           Infinite
PreferredLifeTime       Infinite