Configuring WDS to extend your network

Want to extend your network and make it more reliable and robust?   

Here’s what you will need -

  • Two routers with the same firmware
    • Preferably Tomato or DD-WRT

Login to the first router.  

In this example, the static number 192.168.1.1 is the Main router.

  • Enable the WAN to match your ISP  
  • Enable DHCP
  • Enable Access Point + WDS  (Picture two below)
    • You must have the same wireless configuration on both routers
      • Enter the MAC address of router two under WDS Link with.

Router 1 no 1

Router 1 no 2

Login to the second router

  • Disable the WAN
  • Disable DHCP
  • Assign the router a static IP address (Below we have given the router .250)
  • Enter Router One’s IP Address for the Gateway
  • Enter a DNS of your choice
  • Make the wireless configuration the same as the first router.  Under WDS, change the drop down to automatic.

Router 2 no 1

Router 2 no 2

With the same settings, you can now extend your network several hundred feet under the right conditions.  Because the SSIDs are the same, once you join one of the routers with a smartphone or laptop, it will seamlessly change to the stronger signal.

With Tomato, you can chain together approximately 12 devices.

Links-

Tomato RAF

Shibby’s Tomato

DD-WRT

Note; The IP addresses and MAC addresses are in a lab environment.

How does it look on a network map?  The two routers are actually connected together.  The switch is the four ports on the back of the router closest to the internet.

Map

Protecting your network by pen testing it

This post is for educational purposes and any use of these tools against a network without explicit permission could be illegal.   Metasploit is designed to identify weaknesses in networks and hardware/software on a network.  Do NOT use metasploit for other reasons.

Want to protect your network and the computers in your network?  You can get updates for your operating systems (Linux, Mac, iOS, Android, Windows or whatever) along with updates for third party programs yet you can still be unsecure.    When updating these products, you also have to remember firmware and updates for wireless devices, access points, bridges, firewalls, routers, switches, SCADA devices, robots, mobile devices, printers and any device on your network.

Metasploit

http://www.metasploit.com/download/

Metasploit Community is free and allows for a free scan of your network or server. Although limited (Try Pro for details and Brute Force), Metasploit Community is a first step in finding open services and ports on your operating system, hardware devices such as routers and other devices.   The trick to installing Metasploit is to disable your antivirus or make exceptions to what your antivirus finds.   You should truly install the software inside of a VM (Virtual Machine) so that your computer remains protected.

You can use Metasploit to protect your network by ‘seeing’ what a hacker or malicious person would see.  Truly for network professionals and auditors, this software can help you identify services, ports and weaknesses in your network.

There are several versions of Metasploit – Community, Pro, Express and Framework (Compare Editions)

Metasploit     Metasploit Two

Metasploit Scan Complete     metasploit Hosts

Metasploit Services After Scan

The above scan was in a controlled lab.  Malicious scanning of networks may be illegal.  Read  Penetration Basics on Metasploit’s website.

Tutorials (Videos)

Best IT Professional sites on the web

It’s hard to find great quality information that can be used by IT professionals.  One of the best sites on the web is GEGeek.  This site offers information that is updated often and covers a wide range of IT resources and troubleshooting.  This versatile site offers answers to IT questions covering a plethora of topics from legacy to modern day resources.

No where on the net can you find this amount of information.

GEGeek

 

Rick over at What’s On My PC has another site that is one of the most resourceful sites on the web.
Bookmarks 4 Techs links to over 700+ sites and blogs on the web.  The site offers links, RSS Feeds, news and hundreds of other links.

Bookmarks4techs

The life of a file

The life of a file…

8:00 a.m.  The executive secretary begins writing a credit memo for several clients.  The file has sensitive data.

8:15 a.m.   The file is saved to the documents folder on the secretary’s desktop.   The document is truly on a domain server in her profile folder.   There is one copy of the file.

8:17 a.m.   The secretary opens her email and attaches the file.   The secretary emails the document to ten recipients.

8:17:30 a.m.  The file goes to ten different email servers.

8:18: a.m.  The file now sits on eleven computers- ten email servers and on the company’s domain server.

8:19 a.m. The file gets downloaded onto three tablets and one notebook.   The file is now on 16 devices.

8:19 a.m. The file received by two of the email recipients above is synchronized to a cloud backup service.  The file is now on 19 devices.

8:20 a.m. The file is received by the above tablet and is synchronized onto a cloud backup service and synchronizes with the end-user’s phone and their home desktop computer.  The file is now on 22 devices.

8:20:45 a.m. The file on the above recipient is copied to a third party storage solution from their phone.  The file is now on 23 devices.

8:21 a.m.  The file now synchronizes from the one of the above tablets above and is forwarded to a private email.  The file is downloaded to their phone.  The file is now on 25 devices.

8:29 a.m.  The file is received by the remaining six recipients and is synchronized to five cloud servers, lands on four laptops and three smartphones.   The file is now on 43 devices.

8:30 a.m.  The corporate server synchronizes to a backup drive and shots the secretary’s file to an offsite backup.  The file is now on 45 devices.

8:35 a.m.  The secretary copies the file to a USB drive and prepares for a business meeting at another location.  The file is now on 46 devices.

9:05 a.m. One of the email recipients copies the file to a flashdrive and gives the file to an associate.  The file is now on 47 devices.

9:07 a.m. The secretary arrives at the off-site location and gives the flashdrive to a co-worker.  The co-worker prepares for a presentation and copies the file to a presentation laptop.  The file is now on 48 devices.

9:08 a.m.  The flash drive is placed into the pocket of the co-worker.   One of the email recipients copies the file onto a server and shares the file to 8 co-workers.   Six of the co-workers download the file to their tablets.  The file is now on 55 devices.

9:10 a.m.  The presenter at the offsite location  jogs to an out building to get supplies for the meeting.  The flashdrive falls through a hole in his pocket.

9:12 a.m.   An archiving program on the second server copies the file into a data warehouse server.  The data warehouse server makes a copy of the file and backs up the file.  There is now 57 devices.

9:15 a.m.  One of the email recipients cannot open the file on his tablet.   The email recipient copies the file to a flash drive and moves the file to a company laptop.   The file is now on 58 devices.

9:20 a.m.  An email recipient forwards the email to a wrong address and to three correct addresses.   The file goes to four email servers and is downloaded to three laptops and onto a desktop of one user.   The file is now on 67 devices.

9:21 a.m. The email is synchronized to other devices for the last group of recipients.   The file lands on an addition nine devices.   The file is now on 76 devices.

9:30 a.m. The email servers backup the files for the recipients.  The file is now on now on 90+ devices.

9:31 a.m.  The meeting starts at the offsite location.

9:32 a.m.  A stranger finds the flashdrive that was dropped outside of the building.   Another stranger downloads the email that was wrongfully sent to them.

In today’s world, your one file grows as though it were a microorganism.   It is held by many corporations and can be seen by many individuals…in the first hour.

ncsam10_bnr3

Great Networking tools to analyze your network

ICSI Netalyzer is an excellent online tool that measures over 100 areas of your internet connectivity.  Use this to troubleshoot your internet connectivity.  Hosted by the University of Berkeley, this online tool is a must have when optimizing your network.  http://netalyzr.icsi.berkeley.edu/

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NANO Project – “NANO identifies performance degradations that result from network neutrality violation by an Internet service provider (ISP), such as, differential treatment of specific classes of applications, users, or destinations by the ISP.”   http://www.gtnoise.net/nano/   (Currently available for Linux only – Windows coming soon)

HostView -“HostView is an end-host measuring tool to collect network performance data annotated with users’ perceived quality of the network. Traces collected with HostView will be invaluable for us to design algorithms that automatically diagnose performance problems in individual applications as perceived by end-users.  (Currently for Mac)  http://cmon.lip6.fr/EMD/Download.html

HomeNet Profiler – gives a look at your network around your home – results are uploaded and a private link is given (research only)  http://cmon.lip6.fr/hnp/pages/home

A Search Engine that shows devices on the web

Secure your devices.  Bottom-line, there are malicious users on the web that can find your device (webcams, IP cameras, routers, SCADA and other devices).  Change the default passwords and update software/firmware when it is available.  Disable UPNP and look for vulnerabilities that may affect your device.

 

CNN’s Money on “Hacking anything connected to the internet